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NASA’s InSignt Mars Lander Showcased this Unique Martian Sunrise and You Should Not Miss It

NASA’s Mars InSight Lander shared a unique clip of how a sunrise appears on the Red Planet, and it is an unusual sight to see, especially for the Earth dwellers, which makes it a limited event for them. Sunrises are different on Mars, especially as it has longer days than the planet’s 24 hours, and it is not even called “days” on the other world.

NASA’s InSight Mars Lander Shares Unique Mars Sunrise Clip

NASA InSight Mars Helicopter Discovers Marsquakes: New Details Show Planet Has Large Core and Thin Crust

(Photo : NASA/JPL via Getty Images)
In this handout illustration provided by NASA/JPL, an artist’s conception of the Phoenix Mars Lander on the Red Planet. Phoenix is slated to land on Mars on May 25, 2008.

NASA InSight Mars Lander’s Twitter account posted a clip of the Martian sunrise that gives a unique cognizance of what happens on the Red Planet on its transition from night and day. The media shows how the Sun looks at the surface of Mars and how much farther it looks compared to the Earth, being more extensive compared to it.

It is known that Mars is farther from the central figure of the Solar System compared to the Earth, so it means that it takes longer hours for the planet to rotate on its axis compared to the home planet. However, it is slower to finish a Sol and has completed its full rotation compared to Earth’s entire day.

NASA said that a Sol takes approximately 24 hours and 39 minutes.

Read Also: Lettuce for Microgravity Threats? Studies Show How It Will Help Mars Astronaut in Future Missions

 

What is NASA InSight’s Mission Now?

The primary purpose of InSight’s mission is to conduct a deep study of Mars and see it from a unique perspective that the Curiosity rover cannot achieve. NASA’s Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy, and Heat Transport (InSight) lander is a thorough study of Mar’s crust, mantle, and core through many focuses.

NASA InSight Lander Records 3 Mars Quakes More Than Magnitude 4—One Lasts Over 1 Hour

(Photo : by FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images)

NASA and Its Mars Ventures

NASA has the InSight Mars lander for almost four years now on the Red Planet after initially launching its mission last May 2018, arriving only six months later in November 2018. There have been several problems that the lander faced during its time on Mars, and it is the recent dust storm that left the spacecraft inaccessible as it went into safe mode.

However, it is not the only Mars spacecraft from the home planet that remains on the neighbor planet to continue its missions and help the humans discover more of the space rock. The Ingenuity and Perseverance also conduct its missions here, near the Jezero Crater, and the older Curiosity rover that launched earlier than all spacecraft here.

Mars is an important planet for NASA, and it is because it is the neighbor planet and the last of the four terrestrial planets that revolve around the Sun in the Solar System. It is also the next in line for a possible new haven for humans to live in, as Mercury and Venus are both heated up as they are closer to the hot star, unlike Earth and Mars.

Related Article: NASA Gives Lockheed Martin the Contract to Build MAV and Retrieve Mars’ First Samples from Perseverance

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Written by Isaiah Richard

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