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ISS Uses Microgravity Environment To Better Understand Cancer Tumors, Aging Skin Cells

ISS is now using the microgravity environment to understand skin aging and cancer tumors further. Astronauts stationed at the International Space Station are quite busy conducting various experiments. 

ISS Uses Microgravity Environment To Better Understand Cancer Tumors, Aging Skin Cells

(Photo : Photo by NASA via Getty Images)
In this handout provided by NASA, Backdropped by a blue and white Earth, Space Shuttle Discovery approaches the International Space Station during STS-120 rendezvous and docking operations October 25, 2007. Docking occurred at 7:40 a.m. (CDT) on Oct. 25, 2007. The Harmony node is visible in Discovery’s cargo bay.

Most of them focus on studying the mystery of the galaxy. Meanwhile, other research is about gravity’s absence on the human body. 

On Monday, Feb. 21, the Cygnus space freighter delivered two new biology experiments to the ISS. Two machines are now operating to study cancer and skin cells further. 

ISS Uses Microgravity To Study Skin Aging, Cancer

According to SciTech Daily, the two new types of equipment are MSG (Microgravity Science Glovebox) and LSG (Life Science Glovebox). 

ISS Uses Microgravity Environment To Better Understand Cancer Tumors, Aging Skin Cells

(Photo : Photo by NASA via Getty Images)
In this handout image provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 28 flight engineer, waits at an International Space Station’s pressurized mating adapter (PMA-2) docked to the space shuttle Atlantis, as the station’s robotic system moves the failed pump module (out of frame) over to the spacewalking astronaut.

Also Read: ISS Tests Ultrasonic Tweezers to Know if Remote Object Manipulation is Possible

Thomas Marshburn, a NASA flight engineer, was the one that set up the MSG equipment, which is used to study the molecular and cellular changes in the skin cell samples they have. 

On the other hand, Mark Vande Hei, another NASA flight engineer, uses the Life Science Glovebox machine to observe cancer tumor cells. 

LGS is expected to offer unique insights into the onset and progression of cancer. If the two experiments are successful, ISS astronauts will use the acquired data to improve the current therapies for skin aging and cancer tumors.  

Other Activities of ISS

SpaceNews reported that the International Space Station is now transitioning to the commercial space industry. This means that new commercial space stations will soon replace ISS. 

However, this plan of NASA is expected to affect its partners, making them rethink how to cooperate in low Earth orbit.  

ESA (European Space Agency) Washington office head, Sylvie Espinasse, said that once commercial space stations replace the ISS, the current NASA partners will have some issues bartering resources. 

In other news, ESA’s independence on the ISS is now being considered by European astronauts. Meanwhile, ISS astronauts recently conducted checkups to observe their health. 

For more news updates about ISS and other space topics, always keep your tabs open here at TechTimes.  

Related Article: The International Space Station’s Future Resting Place: Point Nemo At A Glance

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Written by: Griffin Davis

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