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Climate Activists Disrupt Supplies From Three Oil Terminals in the South-East Parts of England

UK
(Photo : Unsplash/ Katie Jowett) UK

Clean energy activists have disrupted the supplies from three oil terminals in England’s Midlands and southeast parts.

The motorists complained that some petrol stations are running short of fuel along with the said areas.

Activists Disrupts Some Parts of England

The UK government stated that only one terminal was out of action on Apr. 10 due to the “Just Stop Oil” protests and that local police forces were working with the industry to make sure that the fuel supplies could be maintained.

A spokesperson of the UK government said that currently, all supply points are operational except one, and this will allow deliveries to be made to those areas which have shortages.

There was also disruption in central London as the activists called Extinct Rebellion stopped traffic crossing Vauxhall and Lambeth bridges, according to The Guardian.

Hundreds of climate campaigners took to Lambeth bridge, which connects Lambeth and Westminster, backed by speakers playing dance music and creating a festival atmosphere.

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Several cars and buses were stopped, but ambulances were given the space to pass through. By the evening of Apr. 10, Lambeth had been cleared of protesters, while traffic resumed on Vauxhall Bridge about an hour and a half later. The police said that 38 arrests had been made.

The founder of FairFuelUK, Howard Cox, which campaigns for low fuel prices for motorists, said that he had been bombarded with messages that garages up and down the country are short of diesel and petrol stock.

Cox stated that the blockades by Just Stop Oil were to blame for the shortage, accusing the activists of carrying out a pointless crusade that they think will save the planet.

However, Caroline Lucas, an MP for the Green party, said that the protests were the only way people felt that they could make their voices heard.

Disrupting Supplies

On Apr. 10, Just Stop Oil said that activists were disrupting supplies from fuel supply points in Warwickshire, Essex, and Hertfordshire, according to Independent.Co.

The group said that the supports had dug a tunnel under a tanker route to the Kingsbury terminal in Warwickshire.

The group said in a statement that the tunnel was concealed by a caravan parked on the roadside and was surrounded by Just Stop Oil supporters, according to Sky News.

The group added that despite a number of police arrests, around five people remain inside the caravan, working on the tunnel.

In the early mornings of Apr. 11, 40 campaigners approached the gates of the Buncefield oil terminal in Hertfordshire and locked themselves to the steel gates. They blocked the entrance.

At around 6:30 am, 40 people swarmed into the Inter Terminals in Grays, Essex, climbing the loading bay pipework and locked on.

The group said they expected that the actions would continue to impact fuel availability at petrol stations across the southeast and the Midlands part of England.

The group is now on its 10th day of action, demanding that the local government end new oil and gas projects in the country.

The spokesperson for the UK government said that they are aware that the protest activity at some oil terminals has led to short-term disruptions to fuel deliveries in the past few days.

The spokesperson added that the local police forces are now working with the industry to ensure that the fuel supplies can be maintained.

In November 2021, climate change activists blocked Amazon warehouses, resulting in 13 arrests.

On Mar. 25, the UK government announced that it plans to install 300,000 EV charging stations as the country fights against climate change.

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Written by Sophie Webster

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